The Milk Mystery

Does milk really do a body good? As a new parent, you may be overwhelmed at all options for milk at the grocery store. Are there benefits to drinking cow’s milk that other milk simply can’t provide? What are some of the biggest milk myths? Plus, what are some alternatives to cow’s milk that might be a better fit for your family?

View Episode Transcript





Parent Savers
The Milk Mystery
Episode 103, April 30th, 2014

[00:00:00]
Please be advised, this transcription was performed from a company independent of New Mommy Media, LLC. As such, translation was required which may alter the accuracy of the transcription.
[Theme Music]
LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: We all know milk does a body good right? But is that really true? And is it true for any kind of milk? Beyond breast milk, what are the best milk choices families can make? Do they even need to make them? I’m registered dietician nutritionist Lynne Schatzlein and today we’re talking about the milk mystery. This is Parent Savers episode 103.

[Theme Music/Intro]

JOHNER RIEHL: Welcome everybody to Parent Savers broadcasting from the birth education centre of San Diego. Parent Savers is your weekly online on the go support group for parent of the newborn years to kindergartner. I’m your host Johner Riehl and thanks again to all of our loyal listeners who join us week in and week out. Thanks also to those of you who may be listening for the first time. As you may know you can join our Parent Savers club and receive access to special bonus contents after each new show plus special giveaways and discounts from time to time. And if you haven’t already please make sure to download the free Parent Savers app available in the Android and iTunes market place so you can automatically have access to all the great parenting advice and conversation we had on Parent Savers every week.

Let’s start this week’s conversation about the milk mystery by introducing everyone who is with us in the studio and there’s a lot of us. For myself I’m Johner Riehl and I’m 40 years old now. I’m the host of Parent Savers. I’ve three boys, a seven year old, a five year old and a two year old. I actually don’t even really like milk that much and maybe that’s where my interest in this topic is kind of come from as why am I always being pushed to like milk and so.

SUNNY GAULT: Because it does the body good right?

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah exactly. Oh and so I’m super excited to talk about this today.

JULIE SANDERS: I’m Julie Sanders. I’m 31. I’m an engineer. I have one girl who will be five months next week and I’m also fascinated by the milk topic.

JOHNER RIEHL: Nice.

STACIE SPENSLEY: I’m Stacie Spensley. I’m also 31 years old. I’m actually a holistic health coach and I have one son who is 13 months old.

JOHNER RIEHL: Nice.

COLINA COROTHERS: Hi I am…

SUNNY GAULT: Hi.

JOHNER RIEHL: Hi.

COLINA COROTHERS: I’m Colina Corothers. That was my son Adam. He is almost 11 months now and he is my only son and I work at a call centre overnight which is always fun and this is a big topic for us too because we are not really into milk.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

COLINA COROTHERS: So.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah. I’m Sunny everyone. I am producing today’s show. I’m also the owner of New Mommy Media which produces Parent Savers, Preggie Pals, The Boob Group and Twin Talks and yeah so I have four children under the age of four. My youngest are identical twin girls and I’ve got two older boys and yeah milk in our house is let’s say the twins are exclusively breast feds so their getting a separate kind of milk and then my older guys are drinking whole milk but I don’t know I’ve been told to go down to 2% and I too Johner I just don’t I mean I do enjoy milk in fact I’m on this crazy chocolate milk spree right now me myself but that maybe a sugar thing. I’m not quite sure but I would love to know the differences and what I should be feeding my kids so.

JOHNER RIEHL: Nice, and Lynne.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Right I’m Lynne Schatzlein. I have two children. I have a boy who’s fifteen and my daughter is thirteen and she was recently diagnosed with diabetes, type 1 diabetes so…

SUNNY GAULT: Wow.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah that’s my challenge going on right now.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right. Well thanks everyone for joining us.

[Theme Music]

JOHNER RIEHL: From time to time on Parent Savers, we take a look at apps and we do tell you if their good for your kids or not for different ranges of ages and today we’re looking at one that I actually think it’s pretty cool kind of a spoiler alert, I think this is a cool app. It’s called Eye Paint Animals, E Y E space paint space animals and it’s from a developer called curious hat. It’s free for IOS and iPad as well as for Android devices and it’s probably geared towards those kids with a little bit more coordination and I mean there’s obviously the whole debate you will always get into when we talk about these things of you know should kids even be playing and how young should they be playing and I’d say this is appropriate for what you think your kid is appropriate to be playing and if they has some coordination you’ll probably do it.

And what it is it comes out with this pre drawn pictures of animals like kangaroo or a cow and with a simple touch just say a part of the kangaroo instead of a basic colouring app it uses your phone’s camera to colour so you then have to find what colour you want to fill it in with. So there’s a blue water bottle here and I’m filling in the pouch of the kangaroo with the blue water bottle and then the tummy I’ll fill in with the black table cloth and then you can use the texture of the carpet as well. And it’s really kind of exploring the world and colours and there’s this stigma I think when you think about kids using phones that they are all just complete suck in to what they’re doing but this one you’re actually using the phone and the colouring as a tool to engage with your outside world.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: I think it’s pretty neat.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: What are you guys reactions?

SUNNY GAULT: Yes I’m going to say my oldest son so he’s about three and a half again between three and a half and four. He’s all about taking pictures right now.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

SUNNY GAULT: And he’s driving us crazy because I even got him like his own little whatever camera.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

SUNNY GAULT: And he still wants to take pictures with our iPad and run up all of our memory.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

SUNNY GAULT: I think this is actually really good because he loves like you know going in to photo booth.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

SUNNY GAULT: And like changing the various you know colours and…

JOHNER RIEHL: And then you have a hundred and fifty pictures of light...

SUNNY GAULT: Exactly of the same thing.

JOHNER RIEHL: His under chin right?

SUNNY GAULT: I think this will be a great app for him because again it’s engaging and it’s getting him to do something else besides just oh here’s another selfie right?

JOHNER RIEHL: Exactly. And you really can kind of makes some complex pictures looking of some different textures and colours in your world.

WOMEN: Yeah.

STACIE SPENSLEY: Especially outside. As they go outside…

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

SUNNY GAULT: Oh yeah.

STACIE SPENSLEY: They start to take pictures of leaves…

SUNNY GAULT: Totally.

STACIE SPENSLEY: And grass and flowers and…

JOHNER RIEHL: And it always became this thing where it’s more about the textures…

SUNNY GAULT: Oh yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: Their showing up than the colours.

SUNNY GAULT: Than the colours.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: There’s actually a couple theirs Eye Paint Monsters one too where they may be around Halloween time it’s fun it’s different monsters that you can do but there’s a couple of different ones on the series but this is definitely one that I’d recommend for parents who are comfortable with their kids playing with their phones and checking out apps. It’s definitely a thumbs up. It’s free in IOS and Android. What do you think Sunny?

SUNNY GAULT: I loved it. Is there any in app purchases or anything like that?

JOHNER RIEHL: Either is in app purchases so as with everything.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: And it’s good you always bring that up. If your kids play with your phone and even if they don’t…

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: The first thing anyone should do with their phone, it’s a setting on your phone, turn off the in app purchases.

SUNNY GAULT: Right.

JOHNER RIEHL: Like don’t even give the anyone the option…

SUNNY GAULT: Right.

JOHNER RIEHL: To do it or think about it. This one does, it’s free…

SUNNY GAULT: Okay.

JOHNER RIEHL: You can buy extra animal packs.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: And their accessible in it and each one if the kids do hit it, the top one is unlocked but the rest are locked.

SUNNY GAULT: Got it.

JOHNER RIEHL: But if in app purchases are blocked they’re never be able to access those.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: Alright if you like it enough and that’s the way that some of this free apps go and a lot of people approach them if they like it they are entertained out of it then they go ahead and then they pay the $0.99.

SUNNY GAULT: Exactly.

JOHNER RIEHL: For one to reward the developer and say thanks for the fun that you have provided our family.

SUNNY GAULT: Yup I’m giving it a thumbs up. I really like it. Yup.

JOHNER RIEHL: Parent Savers thumbs up for Eye Paint Animals. Definitely check it out.

[Theme Music]

JOHNER RIEHL: Today’s topic on Parents Savers is the milk mystery. Today we’re talking with Lynne Schatzlein a registered dietician and nutritionist all about different types of milk, why their good for us, why maybe they’re not good for us and it’s a topic that I’m so excited about so thanks for joining us.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: You’re welcome glad to be here.

JOHNER RIEHL: So what is there anything great about milk and if so what is so great about milk?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Milk is really great I mean when you think about what breast milk we all know that’s awesome.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Right? But when you think about milk, it’s pretty cool I mean it’s got all this nutrition in a neat little package. It has protein and carbohydrate and fat and vitamins and minerals and all these great stuff naturally in this cool package. So I think that’s kind of…

JOHNER RIEHL: It is cool.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: You know the cool thing about it.

JOHNER RIEHL: And I’m always captivated hearing about breast milk in particular and that’s right I mean obviously it all stems from is they can’t reproduce it.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Right.

JOHNER RIEHL: But they know that breast milk is awesome. They know there’re so many cool things in it.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: It can’t be duplicated.

JOHNER RIEHL: And where on 2014 now and they still can’t duplicate it and can’t figure out a way…

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: They can get close but…

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: But they still can’t do it.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: They still can’t do it.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

Women: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: And so what, so in addition to the breast milk for babies but that usually stops definitely about I’d say like five years old but…

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Right.

JOHNER RIEHL: Traditionally in this country you know people aren’t breastfeeding much pass 18 months I’d say.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Right.

JOHNER RIEHL: Like my wife is still breastfeeding our two and a half year old and just gets either surprise looks or you know way to go.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Right.

JOHNER RIEHL: Ata girl.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: For going that far. So what are the different types of milks that humans drink because it then transitions to drinking…

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: It does.

JOHNER RIEHL: Primarily to cow’s milk.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah. In this country its cow’s milk that’s primarily what we drink as far as milk but on other parts of the world there’s sheep’s milk and goat’s milk and buffalo milk and all these different types too that are out there so and nutritionally those are all pretty much the same.

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: With the exception of goat’s milk. Goat’s milk is really low on folic acid, that’s a B vitamin you know we take that one when you’re pregnant to get the folic acid to prevent anaemia and decrease the risk of birth defects. So folic acid is pretty important and goat’s milk just doesn’t have that.

JOHNER RIEHL: And I would imagine that what you know that humans got started drinking milk from that idea that they were drinking it…

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: As a baby.

JOHNER RIEHL: Before as a baby and then they’re not doing it anymore from mom but there is these other animals that have the milk.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Sure yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: So let’s try it.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: And I imagine you know for thousands of years…

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: We’ve been drinking milk…

SUNNY GAULT: Right.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: And so that’s probably right.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: That’s probably how it started.

JOHNER RIEHL: But now cow’s milk is on the pretty big pedestal I feel like you’re in this country as you know the healthy drink to have. It’s whether it’s earned that or not it has sort of reputation I feel like in mainstream that it’s a healthy wholesome choice. How did that happen?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Right. Right.

JOHNER RIEHL: By marketing?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Well yeah marketing you know that wonderful milk must you get…

SUNNY GAULT: Oh yes.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: You know awesome.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: But yeah marketing and we all know it’s a great source of calcium and so people are told oh you have to drink milk to get your calcium and it is…

JOHNER RIEHL: Is it a great source of calcium?

LYNNE SCHATLZLEIN: It is and one cup of milk there’s 300 milligrams.

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: So it is the most concentrated food…

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Source of calcium and other dairy products like yogurt and cheese. Those are the most concentrated. So it becomes a very convenient way to get in the calcium that you need to build our bones.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: To keep our bones strong.

JOHNER RIEHL: But then what about the other stuff that’s in there?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yes. So then you know there are people that aren’t, they don’t tolerate lactose the milk so good.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

LYNN SCHATLZLEIN: So they can’t drink it like I’ve gas, I’m bloating, things like that. So there are things in there that you may not tolerate. Milk allergies is another issues through where if you are allergic to the milk proteins then your baby might get very fuzzy, very colici and irritable so there’s things like that to look out for.

JOHNER RIEHL: Let me go around the room and pool you guys and say I ask you are you guys milk drinkers and are you going to have your cow’s milk? Are you cow’s milk drinkers or are you going to have your kids drink cow’s milk? I would start with Stacie.

STACIE SPENSLEY: No.

JOHNER RIEHL: No vote.

STACIE SPENSLEY: Well I mean there’s good and bad things about milk but we don’t drink cow’s milk. 65% of adults are lactose intolerant at some point of their life is just we just lose the ability to digest it.

JOHNER RIEHL: That’s a lot.

STACIE SPENSLEY: Yeah.

JULIE SANDERS: I’m surprise that it’s that high.

STACIE SPENSLEY: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

STACIE SPENSLEY: I look it up.

JOHNER RIEHL: And it was on Wikipedia.

STACIE SPENSLEY: I know what’s what…

JOHNER RIEHL: I’m joking.

STACIE SPENSLEY. Well part of is…

JOHNER RIEHL: Right!

STACIE SPENSLEY: It’s not where I got it.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

STACIE SPENSLEY: But yeah and so my family are of Northern European ancestries, we actually do okay on cow’s milk but my husband and I are both found that it’s as we get older well even milk on our cereal just you know you get a little rumbly tummy. We do caviar, we do yogurt we do you know fermented products…

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

STACIE SPENSLEY: Which are a little easier for us but we don’t drink cow’s milk anymore because we just ...

JOHNER RIEHL: But the reason is more is because it didn’t make you feel good.

STACIE SPENSLEY: Yeah which I think is a pretty good reason.

WOMAN: That’s right.

WOMAN: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah definitely.

STACIE SPENSLEY: So…

JOHNER RIEHL: How about you Colina?

COLINA COROTHERS: No we don’t drink either and mainly because as a child I was allergic.

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay.

COLINA COROTHERS: And so I just after the allergy kind of wear of is I got a little bit older I didn’t like the taste. And now as I’m adult I find myself being more a lactose intolerant like yogurts. I do yogurt and cheese but straight milk I just cannot do it.

JOHNER RIEHL: And…

COLINA COROTHERS: And that my husband is extremely lactose intolerant so between the two of us is like oh we don’t drink it so we’re just kind of looking into alternative options for our son.

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay.

COLINA COROTHERS: As we figure with our history of allergies on our own families, we don’t even want to even go there with him.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right. But he may end up loving it. He’ll have it on a friend’s house.

COLINA COROTHERS: When we buy milk it’s mainly for cooking and usually the curtain will go bad before we finish using it so…

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

COLINA COROTHERS: And that’s a little curtain.

JOHNER RIEHL: Are you drinking cow’s milk?

JULIE SANDERS: I’m not at the moment because my poor little five month old here has a delicate gastro intestinal system…

JOHNER RIEHL: Got it.

JULIE SANDERS: that yeah so I have to go off dairy completely since I’ve had her but previous to that I was I wouldn’t drink like a glass of milk but I have milk in my cereal. I usually had it in the fridge. My husband like he’s also on the chocolate milk kick.

SUNNY GAULT: Everyone looks at me.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

SUNNY GAULT: It’s just that yeah I’m probably drinking enough milk for everybody in this room.

JOHNER RIEHL: Wow.

SUNNY GAULT: I’m seriously I think we go through a gallon like every two days.

JOHNER RIEHL: My mother-in-law drinks milk and so now she’s over she’s had a cup of milk with dinner and I almost feel like she still lears at me because I’m not having milk with dinner.

SUNNY GAULT: Like what are you missing? You’re missing something.

JOHNER RIEHL: Why didn’t you drink your milk at dinner and like my wife was…

STACIE SPENSLEY: My in laws are coming tomorrow actually to our house. They always like I always forget and I was like oh do you have this now I’m like no. Do you have milk or do you have half and half of the caffeine I’m like no. What do you have? Whole Milk...

JULIE SANDERS: Well in growing up my you know was in the 80’s the whole none fat low fat.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

JULIE SANDERS: Diet craze period and so we always have none fat milk in my house so…

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

JULIE SANDERS: I never drink it growing up because none fat milk taste like muddy water to me.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

JULIE SANDERS: Whole milk is delicious.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah. Yeah.

JULIE SANDERS: Which I discovered in my twenties.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right. Do you drink milk Lynne?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: I do yeah I drink milk I have you should see my fridge right now. I’ve got…

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.
LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: I’ve got milk for the kids.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: For their cereal and they drink it. And my son loves chocolate milk. He a runner so that whole recovery drink thing you know he’s in to the chocolate milk. Whole milk for my coffee and then my husband with a sweet tooth he likes the soy milk the vanilla so…

JOHNER RIEHL: So you’re all into different types yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Our fridge is full of different kinds of milk.

JOHNER RIEHL: Is there something about cow’s milk? Is it maybe the calcium is the answer that you can’t find anywhere else?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: No that’s not true.

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: So I talk to a lot of people all the time who don’t like the taste of milk…

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Or they’re allergic to it or their lactose intolerant so then it becomes a nutrition issue of how do you get the calcium you know in your diet for your bones from other sources so the soy milk that’s fortified. Some people who are lactose intolerant can still digest a little bit of milk or cheese or yogurt like you’re saying so those are excellent choices as well. But then there are some plant foods too that have calcium in them. You know like leafy greens, spinach and broccoli and beans.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: And tofu has calcium in it. So there are other ways to get in calcium into your diet without having to drink milk. So you don’t have to feel like I have to drink three cups a day.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah you don’t have too. There’s other ways.

JOHNER RIEHL: Been brainwashed that if it’s not white how can it have calcium? Right?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Right! Exactly!

JOHNER RIEHL: It doesn’t need to be like that. But I mean real quick I do want to cover this to the RBGH and to the RBST.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Right.

JOHNER RIEHL: And why does that matter? And I feel like the disclaimers are really weird disclaimers that you see on milk too.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: It’s like it’s not like saying anything definitive. It’s really vague.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah what are the RBGH and the BST that’s the growth hormones so…

JOHNER RIEHL: That they get from calcium.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah the bulvine, semetrophine and the growth hormone which are naturally in cows and in milk.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Because of course they have growth hormone but some dairy farmers had added extra additional to the milk to get the cow or give the cow…

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: To get the cow to produce more milk. So…

JOHNER RIEHL: And so they need to label whether or not they’ve added if that’s where the cow have gotten the boost.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Now they do. They do. So we as consumers want to know does our milk have this added hormones in it. Nutritionally does it change the milk? No. So that’s why it’s kind of vague and it’s a weird comment that says there is no difference in the milk whether it has the hormones in it or not.

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: But just the fact that has hormones added to it…

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: People have consumers over that. Do we want hormones on our food? They have ethical concerns about what about the cow? How does that affect the cow?

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: So there’s other issues you know to think about as well.

JOHNER RIEHL: Prior to a nutritional stand point, the milk has the same nutrition.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Right. It doesn’t change the calcium.

JOHNER RIEHL: But it’s the other unknown that that’s all about.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah! Yeah! Right!

JOHNER RIEHL: And our family ears on trying to not get to that...

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Our too we always look for that little you know that symbol on there with the wording that says it doesn’t contain those hormones.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah.

JULIE SANDERS: And organic milk doesn’t…

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Correct.

JULIE SANDERS: Doesn’t have it.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Right.

JULIE SANDERS: Okay.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Right. But you can get none organic milk that doesn’t have it.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right. A non-organic, is that mean what I think it means that the cow, I don’t even know what I think that means anyways…

SUNNY GAULT: They don’t spray the cows with pesticides.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah. They’re not eating the grass that has…

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Any fertilizers and pesticides in it so…

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: That could be passed to the milk.

JOHNER RIEHL: So what are some of the other big milk myths about cow’s milk like they mention who have to drink three cups a day?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Three cups a day that’s the big one. Another myth I think that’s really common and I hear all the time is well doesn’t milk have a lot of sugar on it? And when you read the label, they’ll see like one cup of milk give a little carbohydrate and says 12 grams of sugar. And I have people ask me all the time they say what why are they adding sugar on my milk? But don’t understand that the milk the sugar that’s in there is the natural lactose the milk sugar.

JOHNER RIEHL: Got it.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: That’s in there.

JOHNER RIEHL: I feel like I’ve had milk that had sugar added to it.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Well yeah the chocolate milk.

JOHNER RIEHL: The chocolate milk.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah Exactly.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: But naturally so…

JOHNER RIEHL: Well but that’s so our, he’s five now but his big transition to stop when he stop breastfeeding was to just drink milk like all the time.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Home milk. Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: And it would put him to sleep as well. I don’t even know if we gave him home milk. I guess that’s another question as if we’re doing milk what should we do?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Right.

JOHNER RIEHL: But we got really scared though that he’s going to get cavities because he’s drinking milk at night to help go to sleep as a substitute for nursing.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Oh yeah so yeah anything with their drinking from a bottle as to go to sleep yeah sticks on the teeth.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah. How’s that.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah. Yeah. So water is really the best choice.

JOHNER RIEHL: Best substitute?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah at night time. But if we’re going to buy milk for our family cow’s milk, how do you decide if you like whole 2%, 1%, none fat, is it tasting or is their nutrition factors?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Well as far as nutrition factors go you know after one year then when you’re transitioning to milk, whole milk is what’s recommended up until two years old. The whole milk provides the extra calories…

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: That the babies need and also the fat that’s in the milk is good for brain development, nervous system development. So they need they actually need that extra fat, after two years then you can transition to lower fat reduce fat milk or skimmed milk that would be fine. That’s typically what’s recommended.

JOHNER RIEHL: Well and then I mean I feel like when adult is drinking milk they’re trying to cut the calories.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Sure.

JOHNER RIEHL: Which is the opposite of what you’re trying to do for your young kids.

LYNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah. We don’t need the extra calories.

SUNNY GAULT: But you also don’t want to buy like ten different types of milk necessarily.

JOHNER RIEHL: Only if you need us.

SUNNY GAULT: You don’t have to but if it works for you but you know like I get annoyed when there was like two different things in my fridge. I just want it okay…

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

SUNNY GAULT: If someone has to be on whole milk then we’re all on whole milk and that’s it too bad diet.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: And I guess it depends on how much you’re drinking.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: You know I have whole milk in my coffee…

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: So I put a little bit in there. I’m not worried about the little bit of extra fat that’s in there. Portion size matters you know.

JOHNER RIEHL: I have one more question about cow’s milk but we need to break I know the segment turned kind of long but what’s raw milk? What does that mean?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Oh really good question and we might need a whole segment on this one.

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: But raw milk is unpasteurized milk.

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: So most of the milk that’s in the United States now that we drink is pasteurize which is a heat process that kills 99% of the bacteria that’s in milk so raw milk is milk that has not been pasteurized so it doesn’t go through that process so you have the risk of having all of that bacteria in the milk.

JOHNER RIEHL: Are there other benefits to it that’s why people take the risk?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Right people that are promoters of raw milk say that there’s its more nutritious, it has these probiotics because it has these bacteria in it and when you really look at the nutritional difference between raw milk and pasteurized milk, nutritionally there’s really no difference. I mean to say oh there’s more B vitamins but B vitamins are lost in pasteurization well 5 to 10% lost. That’s not a significant lost in milk whether it’s you know pasteurize or not, it’s still a great source of B vitamins. They’ll say oh vitamin C is reduced by 20% but milk is not a great source of vitamin C to begin with.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: We don’t drink milk for our vitamin C.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: So whether you talking about something that’s not even in there.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: So a lot of people just in this raw food craze…

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: That they feel like well if you know process foods are bad for us and everything should be raw not necessarily are milk.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: You know.

JOHNER RIEHL: And pasteurization is an okay process.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: It’s an okay process…

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: And if you want the probiotics you know from your food to help your immune system and nourish your gut, there’s other safer ways to get probiotics.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah with the yogurt or Kefir or some things like that.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: So…

JOHNER RIEHL: So they do it maybe because there could be good bacteria in there but why play Russian roulette with bacteria when you can kind of…

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: That’s what I say and some promoters say oh you no it’s totally safe and you can never get sick on it. But you look at the CDC reports and they have cases of children getting sick on raw milk. There was I think in the twelve years span that I looked at there were 900 cases of illness from drinking raw fluid milk and then another 600 or so from unpasteurized cheese.

JOHNER RIEHL: Oh wow.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: And a lot of those illnesses resulted in hospitalizations. It’s not just a little tummy ache and diarrhoea.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: It’s severe you know illness it causes.

JOHNER RIEHL: Alright well let’s take this break and when we come back we’ll talk about other kinds of milk and alternatives to cow milk which I know that’s something I’m interested in and hopefully a lot of you guys are that are listening.

[Theme Music]

JOHNER RIEHL: Welcome back everyone to Parent Savers, today we’re talking about the milk mystery with Lynne Schatzlein. So kind of something I’ve read a while ago was and which got me thinking a lot about this topic and probably why we’re all so interested in it is that cow’s milk is the perfect food for baby cows right so why is it being you know it’s not surely the perfect food for humans. So what are some other alternatives that we can look at to get these benefits but not necessarily have to drink cow’s milk either because we don’t like it because two thirds of us are allergic to it. What are some other alternatives that we have?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah there are a lot of good healthy foods out there that provide us with calcium.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: And some of the milk alternatives out there like soy milk and almond milk and rice milk and lot of different choices when you go to the grocery store and when you look at that milk aisle, it’s a little overwhelming nowadays. So which ones are the best ones you know.

JOHNER RIEHL: Soy milk I can’t get my head around soy milk and probably a little time on Google will help me but soy beans are everything right…

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yup.

JOHNER RIEHL: And there is like [inaudible] and could have like these little green beans right?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: So how did they get milk out of that?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah. Well what they do is they grind them up and soak them in water.

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah. So that’s how they get the milk.

JOHNER RIEHL: And then they drain off the little [inaudible] probably.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yup.

JOHNER RIEHL: And then you have the milk.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah. Yeah. And they fortified them with calcium. It’s already got protein in it…

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: From the soy bean so then it’s fortified with calcium so it’s a great alternative for people who have allergies to milk or who are lactose intolerant so.

JOHNER RIEHL: Can you give that to babies though?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: After one year of course.

JOHNER RIEHL: After one year.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah. Yeah. And…

JOHNER RIEHL: That’s with a lot of things.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: That’s with yeah a lot of things and you want to be sure that it is not the light soy milk it’s the original whole full fat soy milk.

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Because again they need the extra calories. They need the extra fats.

JOHNER RIEHL: What’s light?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Light means.

JOHNER RIEHL: Is it water down?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: It’s water down yes.

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yes and they’ve taken out the natural fat.

JOHNER RIEHL: That’s funny because light is a bad word on our house now.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: And I mean you wouldn’t know by what I mean right now but the anything light Kristina won’t let our kids have or anything because of the artificial chemicals but it’s different with soy milk.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right there’s no added aspartame or anything I guess…

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Depending well you got to look at the label and the word light on the food label there’s no legal definition for that.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: So it could mean light in colour. Light in flavour.

JOHNER RIEHL: It’s crazy.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah.

SUNNY GAULT: Which they usually are that’s flavour.

WOMAN: Its nuts.

JOHNER RIEHL: What’s Kefir? I keep hearing you say but I don’t know what it is.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: It’s a fermented yogurt drink.

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: It’s traditional in like Eastern Europe. They have a couple of different kinds but you can buy goat’s milk but basically like a drinkable yogurt. It’s a little tangier.

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay. Does it come in tiny bottles?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: You know well it can. It can.

WOMAN: The ones that I see they look like a giant creamer bottle.

JOHNER RIEHL: Okay.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah. And they start with the pasteurize milk so it’s go the bad bacteria taken out of it but then they add good bacteria.

JOHNER RIEHL: They add good bacteria yeah the key to it.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah so it’s safe.

STACIE SPENSLEY: I used it for a like a smoothie base.

JOHNER RIEHL: What are the types of milk do you all drink?

STACIE SPENSLEY: I don’t really drink anything besides water and tea. I enjoy the taste of alternative milks but they have they usually have emulsifiers or stabilizers or preservatives and I tend to avoid those kinds of ingredients so if I was active enough to make my own nut milks at home…

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: There are some people do.

STACIE SPENSLEY: I might try making some of those. Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN:Yeah you’ve got the time.

STACIE SPENSLEY: I look on how to make them and it seems pretty simple but I’m just you know I like water…

JOHNER RIEHL: And if I want some flavour to it I’ll make tea.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: Well you were a big milk drinker right?

STACIE SPENSLEY: Yeah but I never just drank a glass of milk I put it in anything so yeah it’s really I would bake with it a lot so I that’s kind of I can’t have [inaudible 00:27:44] or dairy right now actually so I don’t bake anyway. But yeah I’d say if I need alternative milk I’ll use can coconut milk.

JOHNER RIEHL: Right.

STACIE SPENSLEY: Because especially that’s one thing I’ll actually buy the light because the brand that I buy is just coconut milk and water and I find that works pretty well as an alternative in things if I mean…

JOHNER RIEHL: Like for baking?

STACIE SPENSLEY: Baking or cooking.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

STACIE SPENSLEY: Things were a…

JOHNER RIEHL: Milk is called for?

STACIE SPENSLEY: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: I do felt like that’s a tough one because a lot of the recipe works better with milk with cow’s milk and with other types of coconut milk.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah with the coconut milk that’s the can coconut milk is a lot of calories.

JULIE SANDERS: Yes.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Really high.

JULIE SANDERS: Which is another reason that I go for the light…

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah.

JULIE SANDERS: Because it’s mix with water.

JOHNER RIEHL: And then aren’t we supposed to avoid things that are in cans too because of the chemicals on the inside of the can.

JULIE SANDERS: Yeah which you can buy the BPA free

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

JULIE SANDERS: Coconut milk cans on I haven’t but I look into which company is in.

JOHNER RIEHL: Nice.

JULIE SANDERS: Yeah.

SUNNY GAULT: I just have to tell you I haven’t thought about milk this in depth before.

WOMAN: It was all to me seriously…

SUNNY GAULT: I know when we first thought about doing this topic I’m thinking okay we’re going to talk about whole milk, 2% slim milk. And now you guys are like blowing my mind.

JOHNER RIEHL: Anything else you want to add about your milk experiences? I thought I was going to come out of this hating cow’s milk more but I’m kind of okay with it. You know like I don’t personally like it. We didn’t vilify cow’s milk and we’re not saying that it’s a horrible food.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Oh no.

JOHNER RIEHL: It just…

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Make the right choices?

JOHNER RIEHL: Make the right choices.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: That are right for you, for your health and age and yeah.

STACIE SPENSLEY: Well I think it’s important to also I know I have a lot of clients who can’t do dairy for whatever reason they’re finding its inflammatory, they’re finding it doesn’t work well with their digestion and they think that the only alternative is soy milk and they are like we said rice milk…

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

STACIE SPENSLEY: There’s coconut milk there’s Almond milk there’s also oat milk and a lot of people actually would do better on goat’s milk which like you said much can be an issue, it can be a lot more expensive but some people do better on goat’s milk because the protein is a little bit more different than a cow’s milk protein.

COLINA COROTHERS: And other foods too like spinach and tofu and broccoli…

STACIE SPENSLEY: My favourite was [inaudible] and are really high in calcium so the cactus paddles?

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: And vegetables have calcium they aren’t just as concentrated.

SUNNY GAULT: Right.

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: And so for adults we can probably eat a pretty good portion of spinach and broccoli but…

SUNNY GAULT: Sure.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Our little kids you know…

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Getting in half a cup of milk is easy were as two cups of cook broccoli…

JOHNER RIEHL: Yeah.

SUNNY GAULT: Right.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Probably not too realistic for toddler.

SUNNY GAULT: Sure.

JOHNER RIEHL: Definitely.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Most toddlers.

JOHNER RIEHL: I like goat’s milk and sheep’s milk cheeses too.

SUNNY GAULT: Yeah.

LYNNE SCHATZLEIN: Yeah.

JOHNER RIEHL: I find that I like those better as well so that’s a whole other topic cheese. We probably have to do…

SUNNY GAULT: The cheese mystery.

JOHNER RIEHL: The cheese mystery. Exactly which I’m getting a cheese plate.

WOMAN: Nice. Feed us.

JOHNER RIEHL: Well thanks so much for joining us. Thanks for the conversation everybody. For more information about this topic or any of our panellists please visit the episode page on our website. We’ll continue the conversation briefly for members of our Parent Savers club with our bonus content after the show. We’ll talk with Lynne Schatzlein about milks effects on bones. I have a pointed question for her about that, about calcium and is it really true that calcium help bones as much as we’ve led to believe. For more information about the Parent Savers club, please visit our website at www.parentsavers.com .

[Theme Music]

Damien Jackson: Hey Parent Savers, this is detective Damien Jackson with the Escondido police department family protection unit and the internet crimes against children task force here in San Diego California. As part of the Escondido police department’s on-going series of community outreach education to help families enhance their personal safety, I’m here to day to talk to you about GPS programming.

Criminals are constantly looking for those easy opportunities these days to take your property and turn it for a quick profit on the street. As new parents, you’re probably on the go a lot and with today’s technology, getting where you needed to be is as simple as tapping an address to your GPS device and off you go getting to your next destination easily and efficiently. However one of the easiest items to spot, steal and quickly sell is that GPS device sitting on your dashboard or centre console for all to see.

It doesn’t matter for that criminal what the best route to sea world might be or where the closest sushi spot is but the address that you’ve programed on the home category is like giving a criminal a treasure map and the x is right on top of your house. My tip for the day, don’t make home your actual home. I’ll be willing to bet there’s not one of you out there listening that doesn’t know how to get from your house to the grocery store or from the grocery store back to your house.

So for an added layer of security and protection for you and your family, instead of using your actual home address, use the grocery store as you’re starting and finishing point on your GPS device when using it to plot out your trips, that way if someone relieves you of your GPS device without your permission you will only be giving them directions to the produce section and not to your family’s castle. For more information on how you can keep your family safe, visit us on Facebook or Twitter at /escondidopolice. With the Escondido police department and the San Diego internet crimes against children task force, I’m detective Damien Jackson reminding you to keep your family safe and smart.

[Theme Music]

JOHNER RIEHL: That wraps up today’s show. Thank you so much for listening to Parent Savers.
Don’t forget to check out our sister shows:
• Preggie Pals for expecting parents
• The Boob Group for moms who breastfeed and
• Twin Talks for parents of multiple kids.

Next week we’re going to be talking about infant CPR.

This is Parent Savers empowering new parents.

[Disclaimer]
This has been a New Mommy Media production. Information and material contained in this episode are presented for educational purposes only. Statements and opinions expressed in this episode are not necessarily those of New Mommy Media and should not be considered facts. Though information in which areas are related to be accurate, it is not intended to replace or substitute for professional, Medical or advisor care and should not be used for diagnosing or treating health care problem or disease or prescribing any medications. If you have questions or concerns regarding your physical or mental health or the health of your baby, please seek assistance from a qualified health care provider.
SUNNY GAULT: New Mommy Media is expanding our line up of shows for new and expecting parents. If you have an idea for a new series or if you’re a business or organization interested in joining our network of shows through a co-branded podcast, visit www.NewMommyMedia.com .

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